Tag Archives: The Boys

2019: RR’s Top TV Shows

Say what you may about its final season, Game of Thrones still isn’t anyone’s mate. Since 2011, thanks to the show, fans worldwide have been privy to high-quality entertainment, the best in decades, so I’ll be damned if I let one polarizing season mess things up so much I don’t give honor to whom its due:

Game of Thrones is RR’s show of the decade! đź‘‘

(Breathes heavily)

Now that we’re done with that, here are the top 20 TV shows that made 2019 awesome for us.

PS: This list includes miniseries, traditional TV series and web-series, and are arranged in no particular order.


1. Four Weddings and a Funeral – Hulu

This miniseries presented a heartfelt, self-contained story about love and loss. It’s n exceptional watch.


2. Euphoria s1 – HBO

Teen angst has never been well captured as HBO did it with this one. Expect lots of sex, drugs and all other crazy teen stuff.


3. Watchmen – HBO

A lot of people are calling this the show of the decade; for a show that premiered just two months ago, that’s pretty commendable. If you haven’t yet, you should watch Regina King kick-ass the HBO way.


4. When they see us – Netflix

There was a time in America when racial injustice didn’t receive as much backlash as it does today; this show takes us back to those perilous times and how four men eventually got compensated for losing their youthful days to an unjust system.


5. Sex Education – Netflix

Gillian Anderson is sexy and we now know it very much, thank you.


6. Chernobyl – HBO

Although one of the biggest disasters to have occured, not much was known about it; this show’s changed that.


7. The Mandalorian – Disney +

Pedro Paschal is having the time of his life playing really fun characters. Though Mando might not seem like it, he’s been having twice his normal fun since Baby Yoda came into his life.


8. Undone – Amazon Prime

The shooting technic used to create this live-action-animation easily makes it one of the best shows of this year. Then, factor in its strong story and cast performance, you’ve got a big winner.


9. See – Apple TV

If you thought Jason Momoa’s awesomeness had peaked out playing Khal Drogo and Aquaman, wait to you meet Baba Voss, his fiercest yet.


10. The Morning Show – Apple TV

Jennifer Aniston is back on TV as Alex Levy. I can tell you one thing though, she’s no Rachel.


11. Barry s2 – HBO

Bill Hader continues to impress as Barry. He’s on fire and so is his character.


12. The Hot Zone – Nat Geo

Ebola is a disease that’s always wiped out large number of people whenever it reappears. This is a trip to one of its earlier occurrence in history.


13. Evil s1 – CBS

Our current world is inherently evil and CBS has found a way to phone-in to make a truly drama from these happenings. If you didn’t like Mike Colter during his time as Luke Cage, then you should like him here as a priest-in-training.


14. Swamp Thing s1 – DC Universe

Although this show got cancelled, it still remains one of the best things to come out of 2019. It’s a pity its strong story and cast performance couldn’t save it from issues behind the scenes.


15. The Boys – Amazon Prime

What will be said of 2019 if we don’t mention the show that gave us the best instance of what it’d be like if Superman and the rest of the Justice League were evil? Nothin good.


16. How to Get Away with Murder – ABC

The current season 6 might be its weakest, but the love I’ve got for the show just wouldn’t let me not include it on this list. I’m sorry.


17. Fleabag s2 – BBC One

Fleabag is hilarious, entertaining, and mostly educative. It’s obvious a lot of work went into the crafting of this piece of art; great writing, awesome acting, and a very believable world; definitely worth all the hype.


18. Doom Patrol s1 – DC Universe

Another DC offering that really surprised me. Just like Legends of Tomorrow, this show knows it’s stupid and embraces it well.


19. Stranger Things s3 – Netflix

Allow your mind to be blow again by Eleven and her crew of merry men and women.


20. Carnival Row s1 – Amazon Prime

No doubt, 2019 was a good year for Amazon. This Orlando Bloom/ Cara Delevingne lead fairytale fantasy also helped make it so.


Honorable mentions: The Crown; Love, Death & Robots; The Terror; Good Omens; Mindhunter s2; Emergence; AHS: 84; Godfather of Harlem; Succession; A discovery of Witches; Stranger Things; Killing Eve s2; The Politician s1; Agents of SHIELD s6; All Rise s1.

Rinzy Reviews ‘The Boys’ Season One (2019)

Release Date: July 26

Network: Amazon Prime

Starring: Karl Urban, Anthony Starr, Jack Quaid, Jessie T. Usher, Erin Moriarty, Laz Alonso, Tomer Capon,



If you’ve ever wondered what goes on in superhero teams like the Justice League when Darkseid or Doomsday isn’t threatening the existence of life on Earth, The Boys might just be what gives you some perspective. The series exists in a world where superheroes are public knowledge, and are monetized by Vought, a company bent on gaining control of the world’s security.

In the world of The Boys, like most other comicbook based properties, superheroes leave collateral damages in their wake, and there are people willing to do something about it.

Enter Billy Butcher (Karl Urban) and his merry team of amazing boys men.

Butcher recruits Hughie Campbell (Jack Quaid) after fastest man alive A-Train accidentally runs through his girlfriend, Robin. That scene sets the tone for the rest of the series that is is going to be a ride gritty enough to give HBO a run for its money. Hughie is written as a sympathetic character, one whose loss and anger is capitalized by Butcher, who nurses intense hatred for all superheroes – particularly Homelander. He finds in Hughie an easily influenced ally, and together they recruit two friends from Butcher’s past – Frenchie (Tomer Capon) and Mother’s Milk (Laz Alonso) – and that’s when the real fun begins.

One compelling thing about The Boys is its unique approach to superhero storytelling; centering more on the characters as against ostensible acts of heroism commonly obtained in it’s counterparts. It doesn’t take long for one to understand one truth the series bares right from the start – superheroes are the villains of this story. And through the eight episode journey, understanding the motivations for these characters help viewers better appreciate their complexities, and how different they are from their more popular counterparts. You can’t help but think about how if Homelander were to be raised by loving parents (preferably farmers) he’d be more like Superman. It’s this unique angle to storytelling that makes the characters better appreciated even when they’re being bad.

The world of The Boys feels relatable, like what the real world would be like if superheroes really did exist. There are people pulling the strings behind the scenes, full-time PR management, heavily-funded marketing for more publicity, movie deals, and so many other shenanigans that’d normally take a backseat in other superhero stories. Superheroism is a business. Businesses are controlled by people. People are subject to corruption. Superheroes too can be corrupt. It’s this parallel that makes The Boys so much fun to watch.

The show’s casting is terrific, and is as much responsible for the value of the series as is the story. Karl Urban as Billy Butcher works. His undaunting ability to switch from smile-to-scary within the twinkle of an eye is quite terrifying, making him a delight to watch. Jack Quaid is also great as the coming-of-age Hughie. He brings so much dexterity to his craft that makes his grieving for Robin and eventual moving on with Annie/Starlight quite believable. But it’s Anthony Starr’s Homelander that really steals the show. Starr has come a long way since his stint as Lucas Hood on Cinemax’s Banshee. His turn as evil-Superman is downright terrifying. The extreme lengths Homelander would go to keep his secrets are quite disturbing, and how oblivious the general public is to how unsettling their favorite superhero is in private reminds me of how little of someone’s true nature is known to the public eye.

Frenchie and Mother’s Milk start out like one-dimensional, comic-plot characters, but have more depths and layers added that by the end of the eighth episode a feel of familiarity and longing for more is established. Queen Maeve (Dominique McElligot) and The Deep (Chace Crawford) of The Seven feel underused, but there’s still enough of them this season to give an idea of possible paths their characters could follow moving forward. Black Noir on the other hand feels absent from the most part of the series, the character’s scenes could be entirely removed and the show would go on exactly the same. Hopefully, that changes next season.

In a year that’s out to alter the narrative of superheroism in the media The Boys is a welcome addition to the ranks of DoomPatrol, Brightburn, The Umbrella Academy, and the likes. And with that cliffhanger at the end of the last episode, the possibilities for this show moving forward remain bright and endless.


Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5