Tag Archives: Marvel

Rinzy Reviews ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ (2019)

Release Date: July 5

Starring: Tom Holland, Zendaya, Jon Favreau, Jake Gyllenhaal, Marrisa Tomei, Samuel L. Jackson, Cobie Smulders, et al.


Spider-Man: Far From Home‘ rides high off everything we know and love about the MCU. There are a few missed, but, as expected, the glitz and glamor of an MCU-entry makes Mysterio’s illusion and Iron Man’s farewell more believable.

I read somewhere online after the release of Avengers: Endgame that if that movie’s the end of the Infinity Saga era then this one’s its epilogue, and I agree. Spider-Man: Far From Home is like the love song to Tony’s sacrifice to defeat Thanos in the biggest movie of all time, and for the most part it works. Even though I for another Spider-Man movie not to overly reference or feature Tony Stark/Iron Man, I’ve come to a place where I can coexist with this iteration. Here’s the MCU, where Spidey’s Tony’s prodigy, and even in death, his shadow still looks over the lad.

Tom Holland does a great job as Spidey as usual, it’s as though he was born for the role. Happy Hogan gets a more prominent role in this sequel, and I like it. Zendaya, too, gets more to do, mostly because Holland’s Peter Parker is finally making his move to secure his own MJ just like all the ones before him.

Jake Gyllenhaal shines bright as Quentin Beck aka Mysterio, master of illusions. Jake’s the new kid in the block, but excels at not feeling out of place; this is mostly due to his terrific range as an actor. Though marketed otherwise, Mysterio’s from the comics and animated series is well-known to be a villain, so that’s not the big twist Kevin Feige and his team have planned for this movie. To know what it is, you’d have to go see the movie at the cinema, or wait for its release in digital.

So you know, the twists are mind-blowing. Make sure to stick around for the mid and post credit scenes, in my opinion they’re the juiciest part of the movie.


Directed by: John Watts

Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5

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Rinzy Reviews ‘Jessica Jones’ Season 3 (2019)

Release Date: June 14

Network: Netflix

Starring: Krysten Ritter, Rachael Taylor, Eka Darville, Carrie-Ann Moss, Jeremy Bobb, Benjamin Walker, et al.

***

The popular saying, with great power comes great responsibility is often used in comic book movies to describe a hero’s moral compass, and their trajectory towards the dark, whilst trying to find their way back to the light.

The third and final season of Jessica Jones bares its soul, holding almost nothing back. And though it drags at first, in the show’s usual form takes the titular character on another adventure of twists, turns, and shocking heartbreaks.

Unsurprisingly, and long overdue, this season really shines light on Trish Walker, taking her to really dark places as she further embraces her comic book persona, eventually picking up the alter-ego of Hellcat…

Of course Karl’s near-fatal experiment worked, Jess!

There’d always been darkness in Trish; she’d always loathed being the ordinary sister, missing out of the main action and having to hide behind Jessica’s shadow. And like she endlessly reiterated throughout the season, she wanted this, unlike Jessica. That impulsive need to mostly prove herself Jess coupled with grief drives her over the edge. She’s able to recognize this fact at the point of her incarceration when she blurts I’m the bad guy. Hopefully, this signals some sort of redemption in her future. We’ll never know now, would we?

Although Trish closes the show, the season starts with some other villain, one not up to par with Jessica in terms of physical strength, but full of charisma. Gregory Salinger (the Foolkiller) and his brutal fetish for peeking into his victims’ truth steer the season in a direction that’s both climaxing as it’s thrilling.

The Foolkiller isn’t the first serial killer to be on the show. Kilgrave and Jessica’s mom weren’t big fans of life either, but there was something different in the way Gregory Salinger determined who deserved to live and die. He’s merely human -highly intelligent- yet, still boringly human. But he presented a threat Jessica just couldn’t punch her way through. Through him, we see a side to Jessica that takes a more rational and procedural approach to solving her problems. Seems like there’s hope for New York’s unlikeliest hero after all!

Ruefully, this entry suffers from the same malformation as most of its predecessors in the Netflix corner of the MCU – over-bloated, unnecessarily dragged, and sometimes exhausting to follow. A shortened episode would’ve told a tighter, better paced story, but I guess we should be done regurgitating on this contractual obligations of the show. Multiple episodes reiterate issues already tackled from a new PoV, and even though they shed more light on plot issues, they sometimes become painstaking to follow.

Supporting characters like Malcom, Jeri, and newly introduced characters like Erik, Jess’s new assistant get arcs of their own, and get ample time to shine. Malcom, veers into dark places of his own, but manages to find his way back to the light fast enough to attain redemption. Jeri is still Jeri, scheming, manipulating, and would probably die alone as her lover prophesied.

I’ve been a hardcore fan of Jessica Jones’ series, more than I was for any of the other Defender shows. It’s hard to say goodbye, but I couldn’t be more prouder of how things ended. We’ve watched Jessica grow much over the years into the more mature she’s in now, and can rest easy knowing NYC is in great hands.

PS: Did you catch that surprise cameo from Harlem?

Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Captain Marvel’ (2019)

Release Date: March 8

Starring: Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Jude Law, Ben Mendelsohn, Lashana Lynch, et al.

***

Captain Marvel is one helluva badass lady!

Make no mistake, she’s no damsel in distress, for she’ll whoop your ass effortlessly if need be. Following the lead of Wonder Woman, her DCEU counterpart, Captain Marvel toes the line of recent movies aimed at women encouragement and empowerment, in and out of the cinema. It’s not groundbreaking, but it’s a welcome addition to the club. Whether it’s Carol Danvers kicking ass or Maria Rambeau, her best friend, riding a space jet like it’s a bike, there’s no shortage of high octane moments for women in this movie.

When the announcement of Brie Larson’s casting was made public, a swash of backlash quickly followed. Most termed her acting uninspiring, and unworthy of headlining an MCU movie. Honestly, I think they were wrong; I enjoyed everything about Larson’s portrayal of Ms. Danvers. Her chemistry with Samuel L. Jackson is believable, and the buddy cop, road trip angle of the movie is quite beautiful. I really enjoyed every scene they both shared.

Captain Marvel’s cinematography in deep space shares some semblance with the Guardian of the Galaxy franchise; the aura’s so similar, most times through those early scenes it seemed as though I was watching another one of James Gunn’s creation.

I liked the story twist… The Skrulls not being the villain as portrayed early into the movie. I’m a sucker for characters with shape-shifting powers, and really looking forward to seeing more of these guys in the MCU.

Unfortunately, it’s not all fun and roses with this movie. The major downside I’ve got with this movie is its villain. I have this popular saying, that a hero is only as powerful as his/her villain, and considering just how powerful Carol Danvers is, her nemesis, Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), doesn’t measure up. The villain problem is one that’s plagued Marvel for a long time, but every now and then there comes a movie like Avengers: Infinity War and Spiderman: Homecoming that proves this formula wrong. Even though I hope Marvel finally fixes the problem once and for all, I understand the need to sacrifice a great villain for a good story for the greater good of the cinematic universe, and I’m good with it.

Favorite Scenes:

– When Jude Law’s character challenges Carol to a one on one bawl, only for her to ignore and blast him off.

– When Fury was listing the many ways he’ll always go by the name Fury.

Favorite Appearance

– Phil Coulson.

Standout Characters

– Ben Mendelsohn’s as Skrull boss, Talos.

– Goose the cat.

Favorite Retcon

– Finding out Fury lost an eye to an alien cat.

Directed by: Ryan Fleck

Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Avengers: Endgame’ (2019)

Release Date: April 26

Starring: Robert Down Jr., Chris Evans, Scarlett Johannson, Paul Rudd, Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffallo, Josh Brolin, et al.


Last year, when I first saw Avengers: Infinity War at the cinema, I was in awe at how one movie could be so awesome. How so many characters could be fitted into a run-time of about 150 minutes, and, yet, justice was done to most of the characters. Now, take almost everything I felt about Infinity War and magnify it by three or more… that’s how Avengers: Endgame made me feel, especially in its final act.

Endgame movie leaps five years in time since Infinity War, and Earth’s mightiest heroes have taken the time to handle their grieves in various ways, some better than others (hello, Hawkeye, can you read me?)

In a way, it’s understandable considering all they lost at the hands of the Mad Titan, but the movie fails to address the fallout from their various actions during that time, and instead proceed to erase and ignore that timeline in its entirety with the introduction of time travel. Thanks to the quantum realm and Tony’s groundbreaking technology, The Avengers can now go back in time to various key events that shaped the MCU into the juggernaut it now is.

I liked seeing new parts of scenes previously closed out to viewers, like Alexander Pierce’s appearance after the Battle of New York, which gave an insight into how Loki’s Sceptre got into the hands of Hydra kicking off the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, and so many more tidbits.

By the final act of Avengers: Endgame, Thanos proved once again why he’s the perfect big bad for the MCU. “I am inevitable,” he says, and I almost concurred, that is until that snap didn’t work. Thanks to Tony’s sacrifice, Earth’s mightiest heroes (what’s left of them) can live to fight another day, and for that were grateful.
Thank you Marvel for 11 years of awesomeness. This was a terrific swansong ; I love you 3,000 ♥️.


Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5

Directed by: Anthony and Joe Russo

Rinzy Reviews ‘The Punisher’ Season Two (2019)

Release Date: January 18

Network: Netflix/ 13 episodes

Starring: Jon Bernthal, Ben Barnes, Georgia Whigham, Amber Rose Revah, Josh Stewart, Annette O’Toole, Corbin Bernsen, et al.

***

The major theme of The Punisher season two is family. On different fronts, the show tries to explore what that word really means. Frank, Curtis and Russo’s history in the army easily comes to mind; but there’s also the fact of Russo (now Jigsaw, in a manner of speaking) banding together another set of war veteran misfits looking to fight another war into his Frank-Castle-Killing-Club. Billy Russo, even with his PTSD and memory loss, is worse than ever, and easily motivates these persons into fighting his personal war with the Punisher. Talk about a charismatic leader.

There’s also Amy, the girl without a family, and how some wrong life choices land her in Frank Castle’s laps long enough for him to begin to see her as his daughter. Lastly, there’s the person of religious assassin John Pilgrim, and how every murder he’s committed in the name of the Schultz has been in service of his two sons and (eventually) late wife.

This central theme of family spins two entirely separately stories connected only by the antihero – Frank Castle aka The Punisher. Even though he doesn’t really do much punishing anymore as at when the season begins, it doesn’t take long for one (or two) nasty persons to do something to get him angry enough to willing murder gratuitously. In this case, it’s a group of crazy people who shoot at his newfound bartender girlfriend (or more accurately, sex mate he was beginning to catch feelings for). This is enough motivation for Frank Castle to be drawn into the many crazies of Amy’s world, which all turned out to be the Schultz parents sending assassins (including John Pilgrim) after her simply because she’s using photos of their son kissing another man to blackmail them.

The second plot is what really retcons both seasons of the show. It deals with the consequences of the fallout between Frank Castle and Billy Russo in the season one finale. After Frank successfully enacted his revenge on Billy by brutally disfiguring him, the doctors manage to salvage his face, but with severe memory loss and PTSD from the events of that night ay the park, Russo is still a bitter, angry man desperate to fill in the blanks. Some things never change. But luckily for him, he has a psychologist with a sad past enough to get her triggered as she helps him heal. Together, they go further down the drain – committing unspeakable crimes in their bid to stay together as destined true loves.

Agent Dinah proves to still be an interesting addition to the show. I enjoyed every moment with her dealing with her fallout from Russo last season. PTSD is a big deal and, just like Russo, she too has her fair share of it.

Frank Castle’s war veteran friend Curtis features more prominently this season, and manages not to be much of a bore.

For the better part of it, The Punisher‘s second doesn’t really improve upon its first season, I thought it was a tad weaker. But it’s a wonderful watch, with enough emotion to go with the grit allowing you care about Mr. Castle and Russo and all the death and destructions they cause in their wake.

Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Runaways’ Season 2 (2018)

Release Date: December 21

Network: Hulu

Starring: Gregg Sulkin, Ariela Barer, Annie Wersching, James Marsters, et al.

***

There’s something about TV shows and their decline in quality as they progress. Well, I want to tell you this isn’t one of those cases. Marvel’s Runaways, at least this second season, is a vast improvement from its predecessor.

The sophomore outing of Marvel’s Runaways is a high octane adventure story that arrives just in time to keep you occupied and entertained this Christmas season. Whosever had the idea to release all episodes at once to binge-watch, unlike the first one, deserves high accolades.

The season picks up moments after the last one and starts off strong. The kids are on the run, and have finally earned the title of runaways. Remember they were framed for the murder of Destiny Gonzalez at the end of last season? So, they’ve got so many things working against them riding in. But together, they rise above all these many limitations and gain grounds towards stopping their parents and the many evils they perpetrate in the names of their children.

We see a lot of great character arcs between the children and their parents, a dynamic that works considerably well bearing in mind the commendable acting talents tasked with making it happen. Alex and Nico find time amidst the dramas in their personal loves to step in as team leader; Gert battles with her live without her antidepressants and balancing her love life with Chase; Molly is tasked with growing up too fast; and Karolina has to face the fact that Jonah is her father and that there are infact other people like her in the world. This particular arc makes up a bulk of the season’s story, which gave us one of the most intense scenes of the season when Jonah’s seemingly defeated.

The show tries very hard to make filler episodes not seem like fillers at all, which is very commendable. The whole plot between Pride and the corrupt police team was just them bidding time enough till the plot twist between the magistrate and his family gets revealed. I thought it was impressive though.

As I’ve said before, the second season of Runaways is a remarkable improvement over the first one. So, if like me, that one left a bitter taste in your mouth, be sure this one will wipe it off.

Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

RR’s Top Ten TV Shows Of 2018

The amount of contents yearly produced for the small screen makes it almost impossible to keep up, even for people whose full time job is watching and talking film. Notwithstanding, I did my best. It’s been a terrific year for the small screen, many classic works of art aired to millions around the globe. And, as usual, I’ve put together a list to appreciate all the shows that made me feel good.

Below is my list of TV shows that struck something in me, irrespective of genre or professional critics’ opinion.

PS: 2018 has a lot of great TV shows; and it was tough limiting them to ten. I apologize in advance if your favorite(s) don’t make the list. Do air your grievance in the comment box.

10. Marvel’s Runaways s2

Even though its a late year release, Runaways sees a vast improvement in its writing, acting and story in its sophomore year. It’s a better outing than its first.



9. The Hunting of Hill House s1

Netflix continues to be the gift that keeps on giving. I really enjoyed this horror show about a small family terrorized by their past. Even though it got neatly tied out, a part of me still wishes it’ll have a second season focusing on the same family. You can read my review here.



8. American Crime Story s2: The Assassination of Gianni Versace

Even though though it’s got a misleading title, fans can’t stop raving over the beauty that’s this year’s entry into the American Crime Story anthology, and that’s largely due to Darren Criss’ performance. We sure owe him a lot.



7. Chilling Adventures of Sabrina s1

Another Netflix offering that helped make the year better.



6. The Handmaid’s Tale s2

In Gilead, things bad things happen. And it’s up to Offred (or June, whatever she goes by these days) to change the narrative back to the saner days.



5. Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD s5

Everyone who knows me knows Agents of SHIELD has been one of my favorite shows for some years now. The shows never disappoints. It’s sad I have to wait longer for another season to arrive.



4. Marvel’s Daredevil s3

Daredevil was arguably at its best this season. A nice retrace back to its root. Which makes its sudden cancellation all the more painful.



Just before I unveil my top three, I’d list to list some honorable mentions. Please note that they’re in no particular order.

  • Titans s1
  • AHS s8
  • The Deuce s2
  • Jack Ryan s1
  • Luke Cage s2
  • Krypton s1
  • Barry s1
  • Dirty John s1


3. Westworld s2

After a wonderful first outing in 2016, Westworld tries its best to live up to the hype that its the goto show for unexpected twists and turns in timelines.



2. HTGAWM s4&5

Previously on How to get away with murder….

That’s all I need to hear to make my Thursdays. Viola Davis and the rest of the remarkable cast continue to do impressive works. Coupled with the fact that Wes is still dead, this show is definitely one of my favorites.



1. DC’s Legends of Tomorrow s3&4

Never in the history of TV has a show as silly and self-aware as Legends of Tomorrow ever existed. Whoever birthed the idea to make it this way sure has my respect. The sillier the show gets, the happier I become.




I followed a lot of TV shows this year, and it’s only fitting I liked some more than others, doesn’t mean those not mentioned are bad. As I said earlier, I’d like to know your thoughts in the comment box..