Category Archives: TV show Review

Altered Carbon’s Second Season Feels Like A New Show Existing In An Old One – Review

I’m not sure if the title of this article makes sense, but that’s exactly how I felt after binging all eight (8) episodes of the long-awaited sequel.

After the climatic events of the first season, it’s taken Taekeshi Kovacs (now played by the more-handsome-a-little-less-brooding Anthony Mackie) 30 years before he’s faced with a worthy new another adventure.

It’s not like time really matters in Tak’s world, a generation that has found a way to defy death, the concept of time is very much different than it is in today’s real world.

The first season of Altered Carbon will probably go down in history as one of the best cyberpunk storytelling of all time. And while this new season does its best to live up to that high standard, it marginally fails to.

Anthony Mackie

Altered Carbon had a rocky trip to a second season, at a point we weren’t sure it was ever going to happen (which puts a third season up for more serious contention, all things considered).

One of the blows, when it finally got greenlit, was that Joel Kinnaman wasn’t going to be returning as Taekeshi Kovacs. Although that news felt like a knife through my heart, storywise it made sense. Taekeshi was simply going to jump into another meat sac same way he did into Kinnaman’s. The problem was, Kinnaman had come to make the character his own in ways even the original Tak couldn’t.

This isn’t me taking a swipe at the man who’s played Falcon for six years and is about to take up the mantle of Captain America, no. On the contrary, I think Mackie is very talented, but his Taekeshi Kovacs felt very different from the one we all fell in love with last season.

IN FACT, THE ENTIRE SHOW FELT DIFFERENT.

Different isn’t a bad thing, I like different. I like the story this season sort to tell – about family, love and honor – I liked the new characters -Trepp, Denica Harlan, et al.- I liked the old ones, too, given new depths -Poe, QuellChrist Falcona. But overall, I loved the first season more, by a margin.

Rinzy’s Rating: 3/5

If you’ve seen both seasons, tell me which one you prefer.

Rinzy Reviews ‘Locke & Key’ Season One (2020)

Release Date: Feb. 8 (Netflix)

Starring: Connor Jessup, Emilia Jones, Leisla De Oliveira, et al


Locke & Key‘ is a pretty cool show, better than some of the teen shows out there. Yes, there’s love angst, deceit, back-stabbing, and all the familiar element in the teenage genre lot, but there’s some genuinely cool surprises, too.

The story’s progression starts a tad slow at first, but then picks up steam and becomes almost impossible to drop until the binging is over.

My favorite character on the show is Bode Locke and I believe he’ll easily be yours, too, if you watch. Although the youngest, Bode showcases more maturity and makes comparatively wiser choices than most of the adult characters, which says a lot about how efficient children can be with making the best out of situations, in the real world.

The show’s set up a future of endless possibilities with its explosive finale, but more important is the fact that it needs to take some steps back in time and provide answers to a lot of questions it should’ve already answered this first season like, where do Dodge and the keys come from, and what makes the Lockes and key-house so special? Hopefully, we get these sorted out once Netflix greenlights another season. Until then, we’ll make due replaying some of the poor chocies these characters made and plotting how best they can still redeem themselves.


Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

Review: Power Series Finale Is Disappointing

I have no more hate to give to Tariq anymore… nigga simply disgusts me.

Ghost, Tommy, Angie, Saxe, and everyone who laid the solid foundation at the start of the show deserved better than this resolution we got. Ghost deserved better than Tasha and Tariq.

Rather than marry a wife like Tasha and have a son like Tariq, I’d rather die a monk.

Tueh!

I really hoped the season finale would have, at least, one more trick up its sleeve; apparently, it didn’t. It was a straight-forward, annoying in some parts, weak resolution to six-years of storytelling.

Who do they think will watch whatever bigger trash they’ve got planned with the spin-off?

PS: That epilogue of Jamie, Tommy, and Angie back in 1996 would have had a more fitting punch if only they’d gotten better actors. Sorry Carl Gallagher.

Rinzy Reviews ‘Les Miserable’ (2018)

Network: BBC

Starring: Dominic West, Lily Collins, David Oyelowo, Olivia Colman, Josh O’Connor, David Bradley, Ellie Bamber, et al.


Putting it mildly, Les Miserable is a story of how much good can still come out of a person, even when the world is being evil.

Jean Valjean (Dominic West) has seen and lived through the harshness of this world to a very high degree, but yet outlandishly refuses to succumb to the high pressures of the dark side. Hot on his heels, through many years on the run, is Inspector Javert (played to near excellence by the very talented David Oyelowo). Throughout the course of the miniseries, Javert harbors a long hatred for Monsieur Valjean; with him claiming, more than once, that he can’t find peace until criminals like Valjean are brought to book. The farce here is that Valjean happens to be the most selfless character on the show, a fact that doesn’t bode so well for Javert when he finally realizes how wrong he’s been about him.

To Jean Valjean, Dominic West brings his A-game (well, at his point in his long career we’d expect nothing less). His facial cues and expressions are top-notch when he’s not speaking, making his character even more relatable.

The rest of the cast are wonderful in their respective roles. Olivia Colman is always a delight to watch, even when she’s playing a despicable wrench of a woman whose reward for living an awful life is rotting in jail. Not the end I was hoping for, but it’ll do.

The set is top-notch, it’s clear a lot of research and work went into the birthing of the show.

The six hours spent Les Miserable is a good investment in quality TV.

PS: This one isn’t a musical, not in the slightest.


Rinzy’s Rating: 3/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Dracula’ (2020)

Network: BBC – Netflix

Release Date – January 1, 2 & 3

Starring: Claes Bang, Dolly Wells, et al


A better title for this miniseries should’ve been ‘The Charismatic Evolution of Count Dracula’ because, a transformation story is what we get in Dracula.

Since his first introduction to the public in Bram Stoker’s 1897 eponymous novel, Count Dracula has enjoyed an ever-increasing popularity with the masses. When report had it that the BBC and Netflix were teaming up to resurrect him once more, the news was very well received because there’s always going to be a new Dracula movie.

Does it live up to expectation?

For a three-part miniseries, things went to shit real fast on Dracula. Each episode runs for about 90 minutes, so that’s basically three movies for the price of one. The episodes boasts of commendable set pieces, intense plotting and some unforgettable dialogues like the one below, courtesy of the world’s most awesome nun (Sister Agatha):

Like many women my age I am trapped in a loveless marriage, maintaining appearances for the sake of a roof over my head

As the story progressed, the miniseries reinvented itself while still telling a central story about the titular, charismatic villain. The nature of this progression allowed the show morph through various amazing locations — a castle, a ship and a graveyard, amongst others — which helped elevate it even at times when the story quality waned.

Claes Bang’s performance as Count Dracula is terrific. He’s menacing, yet charming enough to draw unsuspecting victims in for his next kill. Dolly Wells, too, puts up a good one as Sister Agatha, the nun with trust issues pertaining God-stuff. Weird, right?

Verdict

The latest peak into the life and times of Count Dracula starts strong but quickly leaves much to be desired. Is that to say it’s terrible? NO!


Rinzy’s Rating: 3/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘You’ Season 2

Release Date: December 26 (Netflix)

Starring: Penn Badgley, Victoria Pendretti, et al.


The second season of ‘You‘ starts cool and ends with a killer BANG! Typical You style.

It’s the same Joe, but with a new name, in a new town and with new tricks up his sleeves. You tries to reinvent itself without having to lose all of the things that made it such an awesome hit in the first place. Luckily, it pulled it off.

Last season ended with Joe’s ex, Candace, return to life with a personal vendetta against him. To escape, Joe runs to Los Angeles, a place he knows Candace knows he hates and promises to turn a new leaf. Expectedly, this doesn’t hold up as he soon finds his new YOU to pine over – Love Quinn. Joe finds himself thrust into the extra-eventful drama that is life with Love, her hippie brother, Forty, and the rest of her family and friends.

Love takes an interest in Joe and, although he tries to fight it off at first, he succumbs to his desires and a romance kicks-off between them. To further prove himself worthy of Love’s love, Joe befriends Forty, who’s trying hard not to be seen as the crazily rich drug-addict posing as a writer. Although their friendship starts flawed, it quickly morphs into something genuine before the climax of that explosive finale.

Joe (as Will) tries to stay true to his sobriety, even after his cover is exposed by Candace’s arrival in L.A., but it’s like no matter how hard he tries to cover up the universe always finds a way to bring the real him out.

In Love, Joe finds a perfect partner, someone fighting her own demons and is willingly accepts him for who he is, but with a surprising twist, an unplanned baby on the way, a new life and a new neighbor to obsess over, the real question is, how long will Joe’s victory last?


Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

Is ‘Marvel’s Runaways’ Season 3 A Bore To Watch?

Release Date: December 13 (Hulu)

Staring: Rhenzy Feliz, James Marsters, Brittany Ishibashi, et al.


FYI, Marvel’s Runaways isn’t terrible, but it isn’t good enough to remember once you’re done watching. For me, that’s always been the biggest problem about the show; asides, of course, its cringe-worthy dialogues and painful expositions.

The titular Runaways –one of the last surviving shows from the old Marvel TV division– try to make sense of their continued war with the aliens still possessing their parents’ bodies. In 10 very long hours, the show wraps off two lingering storylines and still manages to find time for a crossover with an already cancelled sister show.

The third and final season of Marvel’s Runaways isn’t a bore; its only crime is trying to conclude a story no one really cared about.


Rinzy’s Rating: 3/5