Rinzy Reviews ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ (2019)

Release Date: July 5

Starring: Tom Holland, Zendaya, Jon Favreau, Jake Gyllenhaal, Marrisa Tomei, Samuel L. Jackson, Cobie Smulders, et al.


Spider-Man: Far From Home‘ rides high off everything we know and love about the MCU. There are a few misses, but, as expected, the glitz and glamor of the MCU- makes Mysterio’s illusion and a heart-crushing epilogue to Tony Stark/Iron Man even more believable.

I read somewhere online after the release of Avengers: Endgame that if that movie’s the end of the Infinity Saga era then this one’s its epilogue, and I agree. Spider-Man: Far From Home is like the love song to Tony’s sacrifice to defeat Thanos in the biggest movie of all time, and for the most part it works. Even though I for another Spider-Man movie not to overly reference or feature Tony Stark/Iron Man, I’ve come to a place where I can coexist with this iteration. Here’s the MCU, where Spidey’s Tony’s prodigy, and even in death, his shadow still looks over the lad.

Tom Holland does a great job as Spidey as usual, it’s as though he was born for the role. Happy Hogan gets a more prominent role in this sequel, and I like it. Zendaya, too, gets more to do, mostly because Holland’s Peter Parker is finally making his move to secure his own MJ just like all the ones before him.

Jake Gyllenhaal shines bright as Quentin Beck aka Mysterio, master of illusions. Jake’s the new kid in the block, but excels at not feeling out of place; this is mostly due to the terrific range he possesses as an actor. Though marketed otherwise, Mysterio’s from the comics and animated series is well-known to be a villain, so that’s not the big twist Kevin Feige and his team have planned for this movie. To know what it is, you’d have to go see the movie at the cinema, or wait for its release in digital.

So you know, the twists are mind-blowing. Make sure to stick around for the mid and post credit scenes, in my opinion they’re the juiciest part of the movie.


Directed by: John Watts

Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Aladdin’ (2019)

Release Date: May 24

Starring: Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott, Will Smith, et al.


Aladdin is the latest entry in Disney’s recent obsession with remaking its animated classics. The big question that follow these remakes is if they live up to the high standard set by their originals.

The 1992 animated movie is one of my favorites from the mouse house, and although most part of this remake stays same, there was something about seeing these characters come to life I found novel and very appealing. So, yes, I think it does live up to its original.

Mena Massoud’s Aladdin is still the same urchin with the heart of gold we know and love, and I thought his portrayal of the character was pretty good. Naomi Scott’s Jasmine’s fashion style and curves might be far from the original’s, but she, too, shines in the role. Both actors have palpable chemistry, and the movie wastes no time throwing them together since viewers already know they’re endgame. It’d be pointless to change that because the core message of the movie is at the heart of their love – appearances can be deceiving; the content is always more meaningful than the container.

But even with these two powerful leads, the movie doesn’t really get off the ground until Will Smith’s genie enter the mix. I thought the first 10 minutes we’re cringe-worthy. For an actor whose casting as the fan-favorite character was greeted with much scrutiny, Will Smith turned out to be the best thing about this movie, eventually filling Robin William’s large boot many once thought impossible. Smith’s genie is still hilarious AF, but more human than his predecessor’s. He even gets a love interest; they bear two children, and live happily ever after, in fairytale style. Beautiful twist if you ask me.

This Aladdin is fun, lively, colorful, and lives up to its predecessor in ways many feared it wouldn’t. I love the spin Guy Ritchie puts on the story, especially in the third act with the events leading to Jafar’s downfall. It might not be a whole new world, but it’s a fairly used one, and we’re good with it.


Directed by: Guy Ritchie

Rinzy’s Rating: 3.5/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Men In Black: International’ (2019)

Release Date: June 14

Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Tessa Thompson, Liam Neeson, et al.


MIB: International isn’t half the bad sprout the news made it out to be. Yes, it isn’t what it was during the time of Will Smith and Tommy Lee, but what usually is after the being in existence for over 19 years. Growth is the only thing permanent in life, and that includes the MIB franchise too. Sub-themes of feminism and gender equality abound, clearly reflecting the modern leaps in human relations with one another and what it’d look like if aliens were known to us.

Tessa Thompson and Chris Hemsworth have palpable chemistry taken straight off their MCU history, but even that doesn’t save their respective characters of Agent M and H from feeling a tad estranged.

Agreed, MIB: International is a pointless remake, another attempt by Hollywood to cash out on an already famous property, It plays if safe – start to finish, but it’s still far from the senseless movie it’s made out to be.


Rinzy’s Rating: 3/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Euphoria’ Season One (2019)

Network: HBO

First episode aired: June 16

Starring: Zendaya, Elordi Jacobs, Hunter Schafer, Sydney Sweeney, Eric Dane, et al.


Euphoria is the most realistic teen show you’ll find on air at the moment. The way it handles mature themes is most certainly commendable. Unlike idealistic beliefs, high school kids experiment – they have sex, they do drugs, and they consume large quantities of alcohol even though it’s illegal. Euphoria does its best to tell a realistic story around these themes without romanticizing the idea or making light the struggles of real life people.

Zendaya as Rue is one very interesting character. Her struggle with drug addiction is quite relatable. Actually, most of the characters actually are relatable. In Euphoria, we see teenagers struggling daily to cope with teenage stuff, and sometimes adults secrets – like with Nate Jacobs.

Euphoria‘s season finale left me with mixed feelings. To put it simply, I expected more, but seems the show’s more concerned with setting things up for future season than laying most of its cards on the time, which may be fine for most people, but not me (for some weird reason).

Nate (Elordi Jacobs) is depicted as a character struggling with demons inherited from his father’s secret. He’s let these demons define him for so long, that he’s obviously lost his way, and would do anything to maintain status quo. I wanted him dead by the season finale for what he did to my Fezco, but that didn’t happen, which is both good and bad . That I hate the character so much is testimony that he’s a good one and that the actor and writers have done a great job. I’ll like to see him pay for his sins; poor upbringing isn’t an excuse for bad behavior.

The acting in the show is phenomenal; the casting is perfect. The characters are intriguing, and their personal journeys fascinating. Zendaya does some of her best work yet here. She’s got a way of making you root for Rue to get her way even though you know she desperately needs helps with her addiction. Rue and Jules (Hunter Schafer) have a lot to talk about next season; I hope their fairytale love survives the bomb of the former leaving. And talking about bomb, Maddie has a weapon of mass destruction in her possession, Nate’s dad really should be scared.

This season was a good one, and I’m glad I got to see it. The cinematography bringing, costume, and make up constantly translating what the characters are feeling onto the screen is commendable, and one of the reasons I just can’t get enough of the show. Although I’m not really happy with the season finale, I’m still excited for the future, and the many ways the show can progress. Great job as always, HBO.


Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5

Rinzy Reviews ‘Swamp Thing’ Season One (2019)

First episode aired: May 31

Network: DC Universe

Starring: Crystal Reed, Kevin Durand, Andy Bean, et al.


I don’t think it’s farfetched to crown ‘Swamp Thing‘ the best original show on the DC Universe streaming service.

After ten well-paced episodes, the Swamp Thing‘s first (and only) season has come to an end.

We may never get to know the real reason behind the show’s shocking cancellation, but that doesn’t mean we can’t still clamor for more. Hopefully, the powers that be at Warner Bros. hear our cries and do the needful.

If you’ve been searching for a reason to binge Swamp Thing, here are some pointers:

The show has boasts of a great cast. And there are some familiar faces too; Crystal Reed (Allison Argent in Teen Wolf), Kevin Durand (Vasiliy Det in The Strain), and Andy Bean (Greg Knox in Power), amongst others.

Intriguing characters. If it isn’t Dr. Abby trying to get to the root of the darkness besieging the swamp, then it’s Avery Sutherland constantly scheming to move his diabolical plans forward. Whatever the case, there’s no shortage of drama from the show’s addictive characters.

The visuals are really good for a TV budget. Don’t get it twisted, Swamp Thing is a horror show, and the cinematography does a good job at shrouding the whole town in darkness, vastly establishing the tone of the show.

I’ll advice you don’t get discouraged by the cancellation; the show’s good and I believe time spent binging it will be worth it. Also, the season/series finale does a good job tying off loose ends, while still leaving enough pieces should Warner Bros. renegade on its decision, so you’re assured of closure at the end.

Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5.

Rinzy Reviews ‘The Boys’ Season One (2019)

Release Date: July 26

Network: Amazon Prime

Starring: Karl Urban, Anthony Starr, Jack Quaid, Jessie T. Usher, Erin Moriarty, Laz Alonso, Tomer Capon,



If you’ve ever wondered what goes on in superhero teams like the Justice League when Darkseid or Doomsday isn’t threatening the existence of life on Earth, The Boys might just be what gives you some perspective. The series exists in a world where superheroes are public knowledge, and are monetized by Vought, a company bent on gaining control of the world’s security.

In the world of The Boys, like most other comicbook based properties, superheroes leave collateral damages in their wake, and there are people willing to do something about it.

Enter Billy Butcher (Karl Urban) and his merry team of amazing boys men.

Butcher recruits Hughie Campbell (Jack Quaid) after fastest man alive A-Train accidentally runs through his girlfriend, Robin. That scene sets the tone for the rest of the series that is is going to be a ride gritty enough to give HBO a run for its money. Hughie is written as a sympathetic character, one whose loss and anger is capitalized by Butcher, who nurses intense hatred for all superheroes – particularly Homelander. He finds in Hughie an easily influenced ally, and together they recruit two friends from Butcher’s past – Frenchie (Tomer Capon) and Mother’s Milk (Laz Alonso) – and that’s when the real fun begins.

One compelling thing about The Boys is its unique approach to superhero storytelling; centering more on the characters as against ostensible acts of heroism commonly obtained in it’s counterparts. It doesn’t take long for one to understand one truth the series bares right from the start – superheroes are the villains of this story. And through the eight episode journey, understanding the motivations for these characters help viewers better appreciate their complexities, and how different they are from their more popular counterparts. You can’t help but think about how if Homelander were to be raised by loving parents (preferably farmers) he’d be more like Superman. It’s this unique angle to storytelling that makes the characters better appreciated even when they’re being bad.

The world of The Boys feels relatable, like what the real world would be like if superheroes really did exist. There are people pulling the strings behind the scenes, full-time PR management, heavily-funded marketing for more publicity, movie deals, and so many other shenanigans that’d normally take a backseat in other superhero stories. Superheroism is a business. Businesses are controlled by people. People are subject to corruption. Superheroes too can be corrupt. It’s this parallel that makes The Boys so much fun to watch.

The show’s casting is terrific, and is as much responsible for the value of the series as is the story. Karl Urban as Billy Butcher works. His undaunting ability to switch from smile-to-scary within the twinkle of an eye is quite terrifying, making him a delight to watch. Jack Quaid is also great as the coming-of-age Hughie. He brings so much dexterity to his craft that makes his grieving for Robin and eventual moving on with Annie/Starlight quite believable. But it’s Anthony Starr’s Homelander that really steals the show. Starr has come a long way since his stint as Lucas Hood on Cinemax’s Banshee. His turn as evil-Superman is downright terrifying. The extreme lengths Homelander would go to keep his secrets are quite disturbing, and how oblivious the general public is to how unsettling their favorite superhero is in private reminds me of how little of someone’s true nature is known to the public eye.

Frenchie and Mother’s Milk start out like one-dimensional, comic-plot characters, but have more depths and layers added that by the end of the eighth episode a feel of familiarity and longing for more is established. Queen Maeve (Dominique McElligot) and The Deep (Chace Crawford) of The Seven feel underused, but there’s still enough of them this season to give an idea of possible paths their characters could follow moving forward. Black Noir on the other hand feels absent from the most part of the series, the character’s scenes could be entirely removed and the show would go on exactly the same. Hopefully, that changes next season.

In a year that’s out to alter the narrative of superheroism in the media The Boys is a welcome addition to the ranks of DoomPatrol, Brightburn, The Umbrella Academy, and the likes. And with that cliffhanger at the end of the last episode, the possibilities for this show moving forward remain bright and endless.


Rinzy’s Rating: 4/5